FAQ

Q:

At what age should I start taking my child to the dentist?

A:

When your child’s teeth start to erupt, you should schedule your child’s first dental visit. Teeth generally start to erupt when your infant is six to twelve months old. We recommend seeing the dentist before their first birthday to prevent dental problems.


Q:

Why should my child see a pediatric dentist instead of our regular family dentist?

A:

Pediatric dentists have two to three more years of training and schooling devoted expressly to the unique needs of child patients. A pediatric dentist is specifically focused on children’s health, and has more experience treating children and keeping a child happy in the office.


Q:

Can thumbsucking be harmful for my child’s teeth?

A:

Yes. If your child sucks a pacifier or their thumb for too long, their teeth can become crowded or crooked and this could lead to bite problems. Most children stop sucking their thumbs on their own, but if your child is struggling with a thumb sucking habit by the time their permanent teeth start to come in, we can provide your child with a special mouth appliance that will help them.


Q:

What are dental sealants and why would my child need them?

A:

Sealants are an easy to apply clear plastic material that can fill in the grooves and pitted surfaces of your child’s teeth and protect them from getting cavities. Children have a hard time to clean every area of their teeth and sometimes struggle to develop good brushing habits. Sealants keep food particles from getting caught between your child’s teeth and can help prevent cavities.


Q:

When should my child start using toothpaste?

A:

Before your child turns three only brush your child’s teeth with a soft bristled brush and water. After your child is three years old, they can start using regular toothpaste with supervision. Use a pea sized amount of toothpaste and make sure your child avoids swallowing the excess.


Q:

How safe are dental X-rays?

A:

Dental x-rays are extremely safe. The amount of radiation they give off is extremely small, and pediatric dentists are careful to minimize the child’s exposure even further with lead aprons and other precautions. Dental X-rays represent a far smaller risk than an undetected and untreated dental problem.


Q:

My child plays sports. How can I protect my child’s teeth?

A:

At Banks Pediatric, we recommend mouth guards for children who love sports. Athletic mouth guards are comfortable plastic appliances that protect children’s teeth from sports injuries. At our office, we can create a custom fitted mouth guard specifically for your child.


Q:

What should I do if my child knocks out a permanent tooth?

A:

Do not panic. First, find the tooth. Be sure to hold it by the crown and not the root. Second, place the tooth back into the socket and hold it there with gauze and a wash cloth. If the tooth won’t return to the socket, place it in a clean container with milk. Third, take your child and the tooth to Banks Pediatric immediately. The faster we can act, the better our chances are of saving your child’s tooth.